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the big alcohol lie


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Hi, I'm Chris, a domestic violence and family law attorney in Texas, you are listening to perhaps the realest podcast on Earth. I'm here today to talk about the dangers of alcohol in domestic violence. I am not going to say alcohol is the cause, but based on what I see, there is definitely a correlation.


Bottom Line Up Front:

I do not drink alcohol at all. I used to, but not anymore. That was over seven years ago. I'm not a prude and I definitely do not not drink for religious reasons. But, I will tell you what I am: I'm a disabled combat veteran with Appalachian ancestry. I am rated at 100% by the VA and I'll go ahead and gloss over a few details, but I will say this: after Iraq, I learned that alcohol was not my friend. I remember the last time I drank alcohol. It was a glass of wine. A few days later my wife told me she was pregnant. When I learned that fact, something switched inside my brain, and any desire to drink alcohol completely left me. It was definitely the knowledge that I was going to be a father, and for the first time I was able to see things in HD. I passed the bar exam and now have a successful practice, none of which would have been possible without the removal of certain distractions in my life, or as I call "the big alcohol lie."


Alcohol and Domestic Violence

Studies have shown that alcohol is involved in up to 40% of domestic violence cases. Alcohol can lower inhibitions, increase aggression, and impair judgment, all of which can contribute to domestic violence.


The Dangers of Alcohol

Alcohol can have devastating consequences for victims of domestic violence, their families, and their communities. Victims of domestic violence who are also alcohol users are more likely to experience physical and sexual violence, as well as financial abuse. They are also more likely to stay in abusive relationships.


The Lack of Willingness to Acknowledge the Danger

Our society's "lack of willingness" to acknowledge the danger of alcohol in domestic violence is a problem. Alcohol is often seen as a social lubricant, and it is often excused as a contributing factor in domestic violence. However, it is important to remember that alcohol is not a victimless crime. It can have devastating consequences for victims of domestic violence, their families, and their communities.


What Can Be Done?

We need to do more to educate the public about the dangers of alcohol in domestic violence. We also need to hold perpetrators accountable for their actions, regardless of whether they were drinking at the time. By taking these steps, we can help to reduce the number of domestic violence cases involving alcohol and protect victims and their families.


Additional Thoughts

I acknowledge that alcohol is protected by the 21st amendment, so I'm not advocating for prohibition. However, I do believe that we need to do more to educate the public about the dangers of alcohol and to hold perpetrators accountable for their actions. I also believe that people should be able to make an informed decision about whether or not to drink alcohol, and whether or not to tolerate a partner who drinks alcohol.


The Social Norm of Drinking

In our society, there is a strong social norm around drinking alcohol. It is often seen as the norm to drink at social events, and people who don't drink alcohol may feel pressure to conform. This can make it difficult for people who don't drink alcohol to say no, especially if they are worried about being judged or seen as a "prude."


It's Okay to Say No

It is important to remember that it is okay to say no to alcohol, regardless of what other people think. You don't have to explain yourself or make excuses. You can simply say "no, thank you" and leave it at that. If the person offering the drink keeps pushing, then don't hesitate to respectfully put them in their place a little bit if you have to. If they will not take no for an answer, then maybe you need to reevaluate who your friends are.


If you are struggling with alcohol, there is help available.

If you are struggling with alcohol, there is help available. You can reach out to a therapist, counselor, or support group. There are also many online resources available.


Conclusion

I believe that we need to have a more honest conversation about the dangers of alcohol in domestic violence. We need to stop making excuses for perpetrators and start holding them accountable for their actions. We also need to educate the public about the dangers of alcohol so that people can make informed decisions about their own drinking.



Call to Action

If you or someone you know is experiencing domestic violence, please reach out for help. There are many resources available, including:

  • The National Domestic Violence Hotline: 1-800-799-SAFE (7233)

  • The National Sexual Assault Hotline: 1-800-656-HOPE

  • The Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network (RAINN): https://www.rainn.org

You are not alone. There is help available.


I hope this helps!



(c) 2023 Christopher Meyer Law Firm, PLLC All Rights Reserved The information on this video is for general information, entertainment and educational purposes only. Nothing herein should be taken as legal advice for any individual case or situation This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, an attorney client relationship Please call (281) 845-2472 if you have any questions about this disclaimer.

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